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PHM Summer 2017

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Matters While our College of Population Health will always have the distinction of being the nation's first such college, we recognize that both undergraduate and graduate education in population health is a burgeoning field. In fact, we were very fortunate to host a panel that highlighted the growth in such educational programs at the 2017 Annual Research Meeting of AcademyHealth in New Orleans, LA. I would like to summarize aspects of our presentation, and put the work of our college into a broader national context. AcademyHealth is probably the most prestigious membership organization focused on linking health services research to policy implementation. The organization's 50-year commitment to the field was recounted in a recent editorial in their journal, Health Services Research. In it, Executive Director Dr. Lisa Simpson states that, "… what endures is our field's thirst for relevant knowledge that will improve health in the performance of the health system. What is even more prominent today, however, is the imperative to translate our research into policy and practice impact for our field to continue to be supported by taxpayer investments." 1 I believe that the expansion of educational programs in population health may serve as the bridge between the public health and health services research communities for the betterment of our presently dysfunctional healthcare system. Additional research and commentary by other national leaders supports my thesis, including Dr. Robert H. Brook, of RAND Health and University of California, Los Angeles. In a comprehensive review article, Brook notes that there have been essentially a dozen key facts that have emerged from the aforementioned 50 years of health services research. 2 Among those key facts, central to our definition of population health are: 1) the U.S. healthcare system is wasteful, but one person's waste is another's income; 2) the most powerful determinants of health are socio-economic; 3) quality of care varies dramatically by where one lives, by socio-economic status, and in some cases, by hospital or doctor; and 4) geography is a powerful predictor of health service use. The research and curriculum that emanates from our college would support all of these emerging truths noted by Dr. Brook. In a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Lieu and Platt call for a bridge or a frameshift from health services research to applied research that can make a difference in the healthcare system. 3 While these more contemporary "call to arms" are nothing new, they are increasing in intensity and number. Again, our own survey research 4 supports this bridge concept and, with it, the creation of new leadership roles such as the Chief Population Health Officer. These recent publications were top of mind as I prepared to moderate the special panel discussion in New Orleans. In my opening comments, I noted that the ASPPH (American Society of Programs and Schools of Public Health) has spent nearly a year trying to define the differences between public health and population health. I connected the work noted above by leaders such as Simpson, Brook, and Platt. I also explicitly emphasized that while our panel focused on freestanding colleges and schools, there is a broad national movement in academic medicine to create Divisions of Population Health within Departments of Medicine across the country. Raising All Boats EDITORIAL Continued on page 2 Quarterly Publication Population Health Summer 2017 | Vol. 30, No. 3 Raising All Boats .............................................1 Thomas Jefferson University Commencement Address .......................... 3 Provider Screening for Adolescent Alcohol and Other Drug Use at Jefferson Health: Why It's Important and How We Can Improve .......................4 A Vanguard In Montreal ..............................6 The Changing Landscape of Primary Care: Infection Prevention and Control Implications .................................................... 7 From Clinic to Program: PRIDE and the evolution of LGBTQ+ Healthcare at Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia .........9 The "Accelerating Policies & Research on Food Access, Diet, and Obesity Prevention" Symposium and Its Public Health Significance ......................................10 A Look at Interdisciplinary MPH Student Projects .......................................... 12 JCPH at International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) 22nd Annual Meeting ... 12 Capitol Hill Days 2017 ............................... 13 Meet The New JCPH Health Economics Outcomes Research Fellows .................... 14 Announcements & Upcoming Events Ideas and Articles Welcome ................... 12 Fall 2017 JCPH Forums ........................... 13 Population Health Forum Summaries ..... 14 Congratulations to JCPH Graduates ... 17 JCPH Presentations ................................. 17 JCPH Publications .................................... 18 Retirement Party for Rob Simmons ..... 18 In The News ............................................... 19

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